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Estate Administration Attorneys

Assisting You with All Aspects of Estate Administration & Execution

When an individual creates an estate plan, he or she selects an administrator or executor of the estate. If an estate has no appointed administrator or executor, the court will select one. Upon the estate owner’s death, the administrator or executor is responsible for handling the estate, including ensuring that the terms of any wills or trusts are carried out, debts are paid, and heirs and beneficiaries are informed that estate administration has begun.

Contact an estate administration attorney at Kearney, McWilliams & Davis, PLLC for legal assistance. We can be reached by phone at (713) 936-9620 or via our online contact form.

Responsibilities of an Estate Administrator or Executor

If a person dies without a will, his or her estate is handled by an administrator. If the deceased did have a will, the person who handles the estate is known as the executor. Whether or not the deceased had a will, there are numerous steps involved in properly handling the estate. Although Texas has what is known as “independent administration,” meaning estate administration does not need to be completed under court supervision, it is wise to consult with an attorney if you are the administrator or executor of an estate. There are a number of responsibilities involved, and it is important that you follow the necessary steps to ensure that the deceased’s estate is properly handled.

The responsibilities of an administrator/executor can include:

  • Collecting the deceased’s assets
  • Resolving any debts or claims against the estate
  • Paying all taxes on assets of the estate
  • Distributing assets to heirs and/or beneficiaries
  • Going through the probate process

If the owner of the estate died without a will, the administrator will also need to petition the court to verify heirs, according to Texas law. It is important to remember that the estate administrator or executor is not only representing his or her own interests—the administrator is also responsible for the interests of heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, and any others who may have a claim to the estate.

Discuss Your Situation with Our Experienced Attorneys

If you need assistance with any aspect of estate administration, KMD can help. Our team of experienced attorneys understands the complexities involved in Texas estate planning law. We know that every case is different and are well-prepared to handle even the most complicated of circumstances. Our estate administration lawyers offer personalized, productive, and efficient legal services tailored to your needs.

Contact us online or by phone at (713) 936-9620 to find out how we can help you with your estate administration or estate planning matter.

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